Sample Daily Plan

CO300 Student Syllabus Fall 2010                                                                                Christina Sutton

Students should come to every class prepared to draft and revise their compositions.  Bring all materials to class every day.  Most class discussions and activities won’t take the entire class period so a great deal of work can be completed in class.  Please note that I reserve the right to change or alter exercises and due dates if I realize that students need more or less practice or instruction on different techniques related to their composing.  Bring your Everything’s an Argument to every class.  I may not give advance notice when I am going to have the class work out of the text.

Readings on Rhetoric (from your Advanced Rhetorical Readings text)

Bitzer, Lloyd. “The Rhetorical Situation.” Philosophy and Rhetoric 1.1 (Winter 1968): 1-14.

Corder, Jim W. “Argument as Emergence, Rhetoric as Love.” Rhetoric Review 4.1 (September 1985): 16-32.

Daley, Elizabeth. “Expanding the Concept of Literacy.” Educause Review 38.2 (March/April 2003): 33-40.

McKee, Heidi. “Sound Matters: Notes Toward the Analysis and Design of Sound in Multimodal Webtexts.”  Computers and Composition 23 (2006): 335-354.

Murray, Donald M. “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts.” Eds. Paul Escholz, et al. Language Awareness, 10th ed. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009.

Rose, Mike. “Writing for the Public.” College English 72.3 (January 2010): 284-292.

Swift, Crystal Lane. “ ‘I had an Abortion’: the Rhetorical Situation of a Planned Parenthood T-Shirt.” Qualitative Research Reports in Communication 8.1 (2007): 57-63.

Takayoshi, Pamela and Cynthia Selfe. “Thinking about Multimodality.” Ed. Cynthia L. Selfe. Multimodal Composition: Resources for Teachers. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2007.1-12.

Tannen, Deborah. “Fighting for Our Lives.” The Argument Culture: Stopping America’s War of Words. NY: Ballantine Books, 1998. 3-26.

Young, Richard. “Rogerian Argument and the Context of Situation: Taking a Closer Look.” Rogerian Perspectives: Collaborative Rhetoric for Oral and Written Communication. Ed. Nathaniel Teich Norwood, NJ: Ablex, 1992. 109-121.

Daily Syllabus

Tuesday, August 24th – Introduction to the Course and Writing Studio
For Thursday, August 26th:

  • Reflection #1 – Read Elizabeth Daley’s “Expanding the Concept of Literacy,” in your ART, Advanced Rhetorical Readings, text.  At the top of your page include a one sentence summary (précis or nutshell summary) and, then, write double-spaced response to the chapter and bring your printed page to class on Thursday, August 26th.
  • Read “What is Reading?” posted under File/Course Materials on our Studio Page.
  • Finish your forum entry that explains why your name plate is a visual that captures an essence of you.

Projects I, II, and III – Reading Text and Visuals

Thursday, August 26th – Visual Rhetoric, a Beginning
Tuesday, August 31st:

  • Reflection #2 – Read Deborah Tannen’s “Fighting for our Lives,” in your ART, Advanced Rhetorical Readings, text.  At the top of your page include a one sentence summary (précis or nutshell summary) and, then, write double-spaced, one page response to the essay/chapter and bring your paragraph to class on Tuesday, August 31st.  In your response include how you define “argument” and how this compares or contrasts with Tannen’s experience and definitions.
  • Reflection #3 – Read Chapter 1 in Everything’s an Argument with the expectation that you will write a response to the chapter or have a short quiz on the chapter in class.

Tuesday, August 31st – What is an argument?; Writing Processes; Vocabulary (audience, focus, organization, development, coherence, and style)
For Thursday, September 2nd:  Read “The Face of a Spider” (under File/Course Materials on our Studio Page).

Thursday, September 2nd – Critical Reading/Critical Thinking; “The Face of the Spider”
For Tuesday, September 7th:

  • Read Stephen L. Baird’s “Offshore Oil Drilling: Buying Energy Independence or Buying Time?” posted under File Folder/Course Materials.  Then, write a half page, single spaced (processed) summary of his argument.
  • Read Mary Anette Rose’s “The Environmental Impacts of Offshore Oil Drilling” posted under File Folder/Course Materials.  Then, write a half page, single spaced (processed) summary of his argument.
  • Please print the Baird and Rose summaries on one page to turn in as Reflection #4 and bring an electronic copy of these summaries – Reflection #4 – to class on Tuesday.
  • Study the Detailed Summary Assignment and Choose one of the following essays to write your detailed summary on:
    • Mary Anette Rose’s “The Environmental Impacts of Offshore Oil Drilling” posted under File Folder/Course Materials
    • Stephen L. Baird’s “Offshore Oil Drilling: Buying Energy Independence or Buying Time?” posted under File Folder/Course Materials

Tuesday, September 7th – Detailed Summary Assignment and Word Choice (Verbs)
For Thursday, September 9th:  Draft your detailed summary and bring a hard copy of your draft to class on Thursday.

Thursday, September 9th – Vocabulary (audience, focus, organization, development, coherence, and style) and Sample Summary
Tuesday, September 14th:

  • Continue fine-tuning your detailed summary.
  • Please bring an electronic copy of your detailed summary to class on Tuesday.  Remember, to get full credit for the workshop, you must have a full draft.  Failure to attend this workshop or bring a full draft results in the lowering of your essay grade by one letter grade.

Tuesday, September 14th – Mandatory/Essential Summary Workshop
For Thursday, September 16th:

  • Read the following and then write Reflection #5 explained under number 2.
    • Foreword by Roger Angell in Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.
    • Read the Introduction by E.B. White in Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.
    • Read “An Approach to Style” (pp. 66 – 85) in Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.
    • Read Donald Murray’s “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts” in your ART, Advanced Rhetorical Readings, text.
  • Reflection #5 – On page xviii of Elements of Style E.B. White wrote:  “All through Elements of Style one finds evidence of the author’s [Will Strunk’s] deep sympathy for the reader.  Will felt that the reader was in serious trouble most of the time, floundering in a swamp, and that it was the duty of anyone attempting to write English to drain this swamp quickly and get the reader up on dry ground, or at least throw a rope.”
  • What does this quote mean to you?
  • What does this quote mean to all of us in relation to this writing course.
  • What does this quote have to do with style?

After you address these questions, write a brief (one page) help sheet based on your readings by E.B. White and Donald Murray about how to keep YOUR reader out of the swamp.  Please organize your help sheet so it reads as a quick reference sheet.  For example, you might include topic heading or organize information in bulleted or color code your notes.

Thursday, September 16th – Revision
For Tuesday, September 21st:

  • Prepare detailed summary to be submitted for a grade.  You must include all drafts (at least three and including the draft that I commented on), workshop sheets, and the final draft in your pocket folder.
  • Read Jonathan Chait’s “Dear Leader” OR “Bill Scheider’s “Oil Spill Backlash from the Left” posted under Class Files/Oil Drilling Readings and choose one to write on.  Bring your choice in hard copy form to class on Tuesday.
  • Reflection #6 – Read Lloyd Bitzer’s “The Rhetorical Situation,” in your ART, Advanced Rhetorical Readings, text, and answer the following questions.  This reflection must be word processed – no handwritten submissions will be accepted.
    • What does Professor Bitzer explain the Rhetorical Situation is NOT?
    • How is rhetoric “a mode of altering reality”?
    • How is rhetoric situational?
    • What is Bitzer’s definition of the Rhetorical Situation?
    • What is “exigence?” When is an exigence rhetorical?
    • According to Bitzer, what are the constituents of a rhetorical situation?
    • What are some of its features?
    • What does knowing more about the rhetorical situation have to do with the arguments you write?

Tuesday, September 21st – Reading Arguments, Text Analysis
Detailed Summary Due
For Thursday, September 23rdReflection #7 – Bring a hard copy of your Toulmin for EITHER Jonathan Chait’s “Dear Leader” OR “Bill Scheider’s “Oil Spill Backlash from the Left.”

Thursday, September 23rd – Toulmin Continued and Rhetorical Context
For Tuesday, September 28th:

    • Finish Reflection #7 to turn in for credit.
    • Read pp. 182 through 204 in Everything’s an Argument.
    • Read Friedman’s “No Fooling Mother Nature” under Links on our Studio Page.
    • Read Klare’s “The Oil Catastrophe” under Links on our Studio Page.
    • Read Chait’s “Dear Leader” under Class Files/Oil Readings.
    • Read “Spillover” from The New Republic under Class Files/Oil Readings.
    • Read Helman’s “Slick Performance” under Class Files/Oil Readings.
    • Read “Area of Uncertainty from Maclean Magazine under Class Files/Oil Readings.
    • Read Schneider’s “An Oil Spill Backlash from the Left” under Class Files/Oil Readings.
    • Reflection #8 – Complete the “Rhetorical Context Chart,” under File/Course Materials on our Website.  Please have a hard copy prepared to turn in on Tuesday.

Tuesday, September 28th – More on Bitzer’s Rhetorical Situation and Editorial Rhetorical Analysis Assignment with Samples
For Thursday, September 30th:

  • Choose one of the following to write your Editorial Analysis on.
    • Read Friedman’s “No Fooling Mother Nature” under Links on our Studio Page.
    • Read Klare’s “The Oil Catastrophe” under Links on our Studio Page.
    • Read Chait’s “Dear Leader” under Class Files/Oil Readings.
    • Read Helman’s “Slick Performance” under Class Files/Oil Readings.
    • Read Schneider’s “An Oil Spill Backlash from the Left” under Class Files/Oil Readings.
  • Begin drafting your Editorial Rhetorical Analysis Essay.

Thursday, September 30th – Framing and Citing Sources
For Tuesday, October 5th:

  • Prepare a full draft of your Editorial Analysis for Workshop on Tuesday.
  • Please bring a hard copy of your most recent Editorial Rhetorical Analysis draft to class on Tuesday.  Remember, to get full credit for the workshop, you must have a full draft.  Failure to attend this workshop or bring a full draft results in the lowering of your essay grade by one letter grade.

Tuesday, October 5th – Mandatory/Essential Workshop for the Editorial Rhetorical Analysis Composition and Visual Argument Assignment
For Tuesday, October 12th:

  • Prepare Editorial Rhetorical Analysis Essay to be submitted for a grade.  You must include all drafts (at least three), workshop sheets, and the final draft in your pocket folder.
  • Choose an image to write your visual argument on.
  • Reflection #9 – Read Chapter 14 in Everything is an Argument and write on prompt #2 on page 464. Please turn in a copy of the visual with your analysis.
  • Reflection #10 – Read pp. 38 to 93 in Everything is an Argument.  Respond to the following:
    • Prompt #4 on page 51, but explain in your reflection “how the humor makes an emotional appeal and whether it’s effective” in this written reflection.
    • Prompt #1 on page 67.
    • Prompt #1 on page 93.
  • Work through Visual Exercises CD.  You will be held accountable for the principles of design that each of the 9 mini lessons focuses on.
  • Capture the image in text.  Your rendition in text should be AT LEAST ½ page single spaced.
  • Explain how meaning is created by any of the following design elements
    • Colors
    • Arrangement of elements (contrast, alignment, proximity, focal point)
    • Repetition

Thursday, October 7th – No Class, Department Reading Days
For Tuesday, October 12th:  See assignment under Tuesday, October 5th.
                                  
Tuesday, October 12th – Visual Argument Assignment Cont’d; Analyzing the Form; What is the Visual Argument?
Editorial Rhetorical Analysis Due
Thursday, October 14th:

  • Read Swift’s “’I had an Abortion.’: The Rhetorical Situation of a Planned Parenthood T-Shirt” ,” in your ART, Advanced Rhetorical Readings, text.
  • Finish drafting your Visual Argument Analysis.

Thursday, October 14th – Coherence and Analysis (Transitions)
For Tuesday, October 19th:

  • Continue fine-tuning your Visual Argument Essay.
  • Please bring an electronic copy of your most recent Visual Argument Essay draft to class on Tuesday.  Remember, to get full credit for the workshop, you must have a full draft.  Failure to attend this workshop or bring a full draft results in the lowering of your essay grade by one letter grade.

Tuesday, October 19th – Mandatory and Essential Workshop on the Visual Argument Essay
For Thursday, October 21st:  Prepare Visual Argument Essay to be submitted for a grade.  You must include all drafts (at least three), workshop sheets, and the final draft in your pocket folder.

Projects IV and V – Crafting Arguments

Thursday, October 21st – Building your Project around Your topic, Public and Academic Arguments
Visual Argument Due
For Tuesday, October 26th:

  • Work to Create a Blog at WordPress.com.  Having a blog to post your sources and practice writing to a blog audience will help you as you study to write more effectively.
  • Study the WordPress Help sheet (posted under Class Files/Course materials) and practice some of the activities related to blog development with your newly establish WordPress Blog.
  • Decide on which of the following topics that you will study and write about for the rest of our semester: immigration, media, energy.
  • Please research your topic.
    • Find the arguments related to your topic.
    • Gather key sources for your argument (links or electronic docs or hard copy articles).  You might post the links or references to the docs on your blog as you build your blog around your topic.
  • Reflection #11 – Read Mike Rose’s “Opinion: Writing for the Public” in ART.  Then, using what Rose explains is the importance of writing for the public and your own insights, explain why CO300 students should write an Editorial Rhetorical Analysis Essay.
  • Please read Heidi McKee’s “Sound Matters” in ART.  We will connect the theories of McKee to our argument writing in class on Tuesday.
  • Skim pages 567 – 585 in Everything is an Argument.

Tuesday, October 26th – Annotated Bibliography
For Thursday, October 28th:

  • Have 5 sources available on your Blog.  (You will need 8 total.)  You can have links or downloads or pages dedicated to explaining/summarizing a particular source with pertinent bibliographic information on it.
  • Reflection #12 – Read Takayoshi and Selfe’s “Thinking about Multimodality” in ART.  This article is written to high school and college teachers not to you.  So, in NO LESS THAN one page, answer the following questions from your point of view as a college student in 2010.
  • As you look into the future, do you envision multimodal composition as being a part of your work and freetime?
  • Is multimodal composing really composition?  Why or why not?
  • T & S argue that multimodal composing is engaging.  What do you think?  Do you have concerns?  Are you interested in pursuing multimodal practices?
  • Bring your Everything’s an Argument book to class for the next few weeks.

Thursday, October 28th – Writing Annotations and How you might Build your Blog; Academic Arguments
For Tuesday, November 2nd:

  • If you have decided to include a blog in your projects, have your Annotated Bibliography available on your blog.  Have links to any articles that you can and upload any other sources that are websites, blogs, online videos.  You might have to write a post about sources that you think the bloggers that would go to your site need to consider.  I will be checking these to offer credit.
  • Reflection #13 – Print a hard copy of your Annotated Bibliography to turn in.
  • Read and study pp. 133 to 169 (Chapter 6) in Everything’s an Argument. Pay close attention to the Developing an Academic Argument section.
  • Read and study pp. 171 – 181 in Everything’s an Argument.
  • Reflection #14 – Read Young’s “Rogerian Argument and the Context of Situation: Taking a Closer Look” in ART.  Then, reflect on the argument/argumentative strategies that Young chose to use.  Based on what Everything’s an Argument(pp. 176 – 81)explains about Rogerian argument and what Young defines as Rogerian argument, write a double-spaced page or two on whether or not you think he, Young, uses Rogerian strategies in his argument.  Use examples from his text to support your assertions.
  • Continue bringing your Everything’s an Argument book to class.

Tuesday, November 2nd – Audience
For Thursday, November 4th:

  • Reflection #15 – Read Corder’s “Argument as Emergence, Rhetoric as Love” in ART.  Answer the Rhetoric of Love questions posted under Course Materials.
  • Continue bringing your Everything’s an Argument book to class.

Thursday, November 4th – Focusing your Academic Argument (Introducing Argument); Revisit Claims and Reasons
For Tuesday, November 9th:

  • Reflection #16 – Complete the Rhetorical Prospectus (Plan) for your Academic Argument essay.  Remember that you can’t write to the general public.
  • Read pp. 493 – 513 (Chapter 16) and pp. 536 – 547 (Chapter 18) and pp. 549 – 564 (Chapter 19) in Everything’s an Argument.
  • Reflection #17 – Read Chapter 17 in Everything’s an Argument and complete the Logical Fallacy Worksheet posted under Class Files/Course Materials.
  • Begin drafting your essay.

Tuesday, November 9th – Using Visuals for Academic Argument and Sample Argument
For Thursday, November 11th:

  • Continue polishing your Academic Argument.
  • Please bring an electronic copy of your most recent Academic Argument draft to class on Thursday.  Remember, to get full credit for the workshop, you must have a full draft.  Failure to attend this workshop or bring a full draft results in the lowering of your essay grade by one letter grade.

Thursday, November 11th – Mandatory and Essential Workshop on Academic Argument Essay
For Tuesday, November 16th:

  • Reflection #18 – Read Chapter 13, pp. 417 to 439.  Write out your responses to #3 under RESPOND on p. 439.
  • Prepare your Academic Argument for submission.  On Tuesday, please submit final draft and working drafts in pocket folder.  Any sources on your Works Cited page that I can’t link to or see on your Blog, must be put in your pocket folder in hard copy form.

Tuesday, November 16th – Postscript for Academic Argument and Brief Intro to Public Argument
Academic Argument Essay Due
For Tuesday, November 30th:

  • Reflection #19 – Read Martin Luther King’s essay “Letter to Birmingham Jail.”  (I have placed a link to this argument under Links/Readings on the Web on our Website.)  Then answer the following questions (taken from Crusius and Channell’s The Aims of Argument):
    • Look at paragraphs 2 -4 of King’s letter.  What reasons does he give to justify being in Birmingham?  How does he support each reason? Do his reasons and evidence indicate a strategy aimed at his clearly audience?
    • King’s argument for civil disobedience (paragraphs 15 – 22) is based on one main reason.  What is it, and how does he support it?
    • What are the two reasons King gives to refute his audience’s charge of extremism (paragraphs 27 – 31).
    • Look at the list of Questions for Creating Audience Identification posted under Class Files/Course Materials and then find some examples in King’s letter in which he employs some of these resources of identification; look in other sections than King’s conclusion.  What methods does King use that any persuader might use?

Thursday, November 18th – Work on Focusing your Public Argument
For Tuesday, November 30th:  See assignment under Tuesday, November 16th.

Thanksgiving Break November 21st through 27th

Tuesday, November 30th – Public Argument Assignment; Using Appeals; “Letter from Birmingham Jail”
For Thursday, December 2nd:  Begin drafting your persuasive essay.

Thursday, December 2nd – How to Avoid Replicating the Academic Argument and Finessing Leads
For Tuesday, December 7th:

  • Continue drafting your Public Argument.
  • For Tuesday’s class you will need a hard copy of your Public Argument for workshop.  Your draft must be a full draft.  If you do not bring a full draft, then I reserve the right to lower your essay grade.

Tuesday, December 7th – Workshop on the Public Argument, Mandatory/Essential
For Thursday, December 9th:  Continue polishing your Public Argument.

Thursday, December 9th – Revision
For the final exam:  Prepare your Public Argument for submission.