Sample Daily Plan

CO300 Student Syllabus Fall 2009

Students should come to every class prepared to draft and revise papers they are composing.  Bring all materials to class every day.  Most class discussions and activities won’t take the entire class period so some work can be completed in class.  Please note that I reserve the right to change or alter activities and due dates if I realize that students need more or less practice or instruction on different techniques related to their writing and/or writing processes.  Bring your Aims to every class.  I may not give advance notice when I am going to have the class work out of the text.

Readings on Rhetoric (Under File/Readings on Rhetoric on our Web site):

  • Young’s “Rogerian Argument and the Context of Situation: Taking a Closer Look”
  • Donald Murray’s “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts”
  • Jim W. Corder’s “Argument as Emergence, Rhetoric as Love”
  • Simmons and Grabill’s “Toward a Civic Rhetoric for Technologically and Scientifically Complex Places: Invention, Performance, and Participation”
  • Excerpts from Strunk and White’s Elements of Style

Readings on Course Topic (Under File/Course Topic Readings on our Website):

  • Andy Grove’s “An Energy Policy We Can Stick To”
  • David Rotman’s “The Mess of Mandated Markets”
  • Bradford Plumer’s “Mine, Mine, Mine”
  • Philip Deutch’s “Energy Independence”
  • Frank Verrastro and Sarah Ladislaw’s “Providing Energy Security in an Interdependent World”
  • Nick Kotch’s “African Oil Whose Bonanza?”
  • Jonathan Facelli’s “Pedaling Our Way to Energy Independence”
  • Fareed Zakaria’s “Free At Last”

Tuesday, August 25th – Introduction to the Course and Course topic, and Writing Studio
For Thursday, August 27th:  

  • Reflection #1 – Read Chapter One in AIMS.  Write a one paragraph response (one double-spaced processed page) to the chapter and bring your response to class on Thursday.
  • Skim Chapter Two in AIMS.
  • Read “Examining Writing through a Rhetorical Lens: Overview of the Rhetorical Context” under File/Required Reading on our Website.
  • Skim the following essays:
    • Andy Grove’s “An Energy Policy We Can Stick To”
    • David Rotman’s “The Mess of Mandated Markets”
    • Bradford Plumer’s “Mine, Mine, Mine”
    • Philip Deutch’s “Energy Independence”
    • Frank Verrastro and Sarah Ladislaw’s “Providing Energy Security in an Interdependent World”
    • Nick Kotch’s “African Oil Whose Bonanza?”

Thursday, August 27th –Rhetorical Context, Writing Processes, and What is an Argument?
For Tuesday, September 1st:

  • Read “The Face of the Spider” by David Quammen (under File/Course Readings on Website)
  • Reflection #2 –Complete the “Rhetorical Context Chart,” under File/Online Handouts on our Website, on the following 6 essays:
    • Andy Grove’s “An Energy Policy We Can Stick To”
    • David Rotman’s “The Mess of Mandated Markets”
    • Bradford Plumer’s “Mine, Mine, Mine”
    • Philip Deutch’s “Energy Independence”
    • Frank Verrastro and Sarah Ladislaw’s “Providing Energy Security in an Interdependent World”
    • Nick Kotch’s “African Oil Whose Bonanza?”

Tuesday, September 1st – Critical Reading and Critical Thinking; What is an argument?
For Thursday, September 3rd:

  • Reflection #3 – Write a brief summary for the following essays. These must be processed and printed.
    • Andy Grove’s “An Energy Policy We Can Stick To”
    • David Rotman’s “The Mess of Mandated Markets”
    • Bradford Plumer’s “Mine, Mine, Mine”
    • Philip Deutch’s “Energy Independence”
    • Frank Verrastro and Sarah Ladislaw’s “Providing Energy Security in an Interdependent World”
    • Nick Kotch’s “African Oil Whose Bonanza?”

Thursday, September 3rd – “What is an Argument?” cont’d; Detailed summary (author, essay, argument tags and effective verbs)
For Tuesday, September 8th:

  • Reflection #4 – Read Young’s “Rogerian Argument and the Context of Situation: Taking a Closer Look.” Then, reflect on the argument/argumentative strategies that Young chose to use.  Based on what Chapter One of Aims of Argumentexplains about Rogerian argument and what Young defines as Rogerian argument, write a double-spaced page or two on whether or not you think he, Young, uses Rogerian strategies in his argument.  Use examples from his text to support your assertions.
  • Determine which of the following you will write your detailed summary on and begin to develop the detailed summary.
    • David Rotman’s “The Mess of Mandated Markets”
    • Frank Verrastro and Sarah Ladislaw’s “Providing Energy Security in an Interdependent World”

Tuesday, September 8th – Sample Summary
For Thursday, September 10th:

  • Draft your detailed summary.  Have a full draft – not necessarily polished – for Thursday.
  • Read Foreword by Roger Angell in Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.
  • Read the Introduction by E.B. White in Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.
  • Read “An Approach to Style” (pp. 66 – 85) in Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.

Thursday, September 10th – Revision and Detailed Summary cont’d
For Tuesday, September 15th:

  • Prepare a full draft for workshop on Tuesday.  You will need a hard copy of your detailed summary for workshop.  This must be a full draft.  If you do not bring a full draft of your detailed summary, then I reserve the right to lower your Detailed Summary grade.
  • Read Donald Murray’s “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts.”
  • Reflection #5 – On page xviii of Elements of Style E.B. White wrote:  “All through Elements of Style one finds evidence of the author’s [Will Strunk’s] deep sympathy for the reader.  Will felt that the reader was in serious trouble most of the time, floundering in a swamp, and that it was the duty of anyone attempting to write English to drain this swamp quickly and get the reader up on dry ground, or at least throw a rope.”
    • What does this quote mean to you?
    • What does this quote mean to all of us in relation to this writing course.
    • What does this quote have to do with style?

After you address these questions, write a brief (one page) help sheet based on your readings by E.B. White and Donald Murray about how to keep YOUR reader out of the swamp.  Please organize your help sheet so it reads as a quick reference sheet.  For example, you might include topic headings or organize information in bulleted or color code your notes.

Tuesday, September 15th – Mandatory & Essential Peer Review Workshop on Detailed Summary; Intro to Text Analysis
For Thursday, September 17th:

  • Consider your workshop partner’s suggestions and your detailed summary for effectiveness.
  • Prepare your Detailed Summary essay for submission.  On Thursday, please submit final draft and working drafts in apocket folder.  Your essay is due at the beginning of the class.
  • Read chapter 3 in your Aims of Argument.  This chapter focuses on the Toulmin Method of analyzing arguments.
  • Skim the following short essays and choose ONE to write a Toulmin on.  Please bring a hard copy of the essay that you will write your Toulmin on to class on Thursday.
  • Jonathan Facelli’s “Pedaling Our Way to Energy Independence”
  • Fareed Zakaria’s “Free At Last”

Thursday, September 17th – Fleshing Out the Toulmin
Detailed Summary Due
For Tuesday, September 22nd:

  • Finish drafting your Toulmin and bring a full draft to class on Tuesday.  Two Toulmin handouts are posted on our Web site under File/Online Handouts.

Tuesday, September 22nd – Informal Workshop on Toulmin and REALM
For Thursday, September 24th:

  1. Prepare your Toulmin to be turned in on Thursday.  You must be given credit for your Toulmin before I will grade your REALM Analysis.
  2. Determine which of the following essays you will write your REALM on and bring a hardcopy of that essay to class on Thursday:
    • Frank Verrastro and Sarah Ladislaw’s “Providing Energy Security in an Interdependent World”
    • Nick Kotch’s “African Oil Whose Bonanza?”

Thursday, September 24th – REALM (reader, essay, author)
Toulmin Due – This will be considered Reflection #6.
For Tuesday, September 29th:

  • Reflection #7 – Read Corder’s “Argument as Emergence, Rhetoric as Love.”  Please answer the questions posted under File/Online Handouts: “Corder Questions, Reflection #7.”
  • Study the REALM worksheet and handout (under File/Online Handouts).
  • Bring a working draft of the REALM to class on Tuesday.  Complete the reader, essay, and author sections.

Tuesday, September 29th – REALM (limitations, motivations)
For Thursday, October 1st:

  • For Thursday’s class you will need a hard copy of your REALM analysis for workshop.  Your draft must be a full draft.  If you do not bring a full draft, then I reserve the right to lower your essay grade.

Thursday, October 1st – Mandatory and Essential Peer Review Workshop for REALM essay
For Tuesday, October 6th:

  • Prepare your REALM Analysis for submission.  On Tuesday, please submit final draft and working drafts in a pocket folder.  Your essay is due at the beginning of the class.
  • Determine which of the following essays you will write your Summary/Response on and bring a hardcopy of that essay to class on Tuesday:
  • David Rotman’s “The Mess of Mandated Markets”
  • Andy Grove’s “An Energy Policy We Can Stick To”
  • Read the following response:
  • “An Energetic Debate” by Anne Korin ”  (under File/Course Topic Readings on our Website)

Tuesday, October 6th – Response Essay Assignment; Transitions and Focusing; Adding Insight into the “Discussion”
REALM Analysis Due
For Tuesday, October 13th:

  • Skim chapter 7, “Looking for Some Truth: Arguing to Inquire.”
  • Draft your Summary/Response.

Thursday, October 8th – No Class, English Department Reading Days

Tuesday, October 13th – Sample Response Essay
For Thursday, October 15th:

  • Continue drafting your summary/response.
  • Prepare a full draft of your summary/response essay for workshop on Thursday, October 15th.  If you do not bring a full draft, then I reserve the right to lower your essay grade.

Thursday, October 15th – Mandatory/Essential Response Peer Review Workshop
For Tuesday, October 20th:

  • Reflection #8 – Read Chapter 5 and 6 in Aims.  Write out answers (process your answers) to the following prompts – to be turned in toward your homework grade:
    • What are some guidelines for using sources in your writing?
    • Describe an annotated bibliography.
    • Write down some suggestions for evaluating sources.
    • What are some different types of sources?
    • Explain how to avoid unethical paraphrasing.
  • Prepare your Summary Response for submission.  On Tuesday, October 20th, please submit final draft and working drafts in a pocket folder.  Your essay is due at the beginning of the class.
  • Read Chapter 7 and 8 in Aims.  Be able to fully explain the difference between a convincing and persuading essay.
  • Consider topics for your Convincing and Persuasive Essay that are related to the course topic.

Tuesday, October 20th – Convincing and Persuading, the Series; and Emphasis on Annotated Bibliography
For Thursday, October 22nd:

  • Begin actively exploring your topic for the next two papers.

Thursday, October 22nd –Databases; Meet in the EIL2 (Morgan Library)
Summary Response Due
For Tuesday, October 27th:

  • Have 3 sources available (hard copy) that focus on your topic.

Tuesday, October 27th – Audience and Rhetorical Prospectus
For Thursday, October 29th:

  • Revisit chapter 5 in Aims, Writing Researched-Based Arguments in AIMS (pp. 93 – 151).
  • Begin writing your Rhetorical Prospectus.
  • Prepare your annotated bibliography to turn in.  Have your articles photocopied and ready to turn in with your annotated bibliography.

Thursday, October 29th – Introducing Convincing and Revisit Claims and Reasons for Convincing Essay
Annotated Bibliography Due – This will be counted as Reflection #10.
For Tuesday, November 3rd:

  • Prepare your Rhetorical Prospectus to turn in.  I will not need your drafts for this homework assignment.
  • Write your lead for your Convincing Essay.
  • Bring your Aims to class on Tuesday.

Tuesday, November 3rd – Citing Sources and Framing
Rhetorical Prospectus Due – This will be counted as Reflection #11.
For Thursday, November 5th:

  • Continue drafting your Convincing Essay.

Thursday, November 5th – Using Visuals
For Tuesday, November 10th:

  • Continue drafting your Convincing Essay.
  • Reflection #12 – Please find 5 examples, from our Course Topic Readings of instances where the writers use a visual. Then,
  • Describe the visual OR copy and paste it into your Word doc.
  • Explain why you think the author found it necessary to include the visual.
  • Explain why you think the use of the visual in the article enhances or detracts from the effectiveness of the article.

Tuesday, November 10th – Sample Convincing Essay
For Thursday, November 12th:

  • For Thursday’s class you will need a hard copy of your convincing essay for workshop.  Your draft must be a full draft.  If you do not bring a full draft, then I reserve the right to lower your essay grade.

Thursday, November 12th – Peer Review Workshop Convincing Essay – Mandatory/Essential
For Tuesday, November 17th:
1)   Prepare your convincing essay for submission.  On Tuesday, please submit final draft and working drafts in pocket folder.  Please bring each and every one of your sources.  I will be checking sources against your works cited during class.

Tuesday, November 17th – Persuasive Essay Overview and Check in of Sources
Convincing Essay Due
For Tuesday, December 1st:

  • Revisit Chapter 8 in your text.
  • Carefully consider what action you are going to argue for.  Consider the rhetorical context your will establish for your persuasive essay.
  • Reflection #13 – Carefully read Martin Luther King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” in The Aims of Argument (pp. 250 – 265). Prepare notes on the 4 sets of questions for Following Through on p. 267 and the Following Through on page 268.  These will count toward your participation grade.  (This will be due on Thursday, December 3rd.

Thursday, November 19th – Introduction to Persuasive Essay

No Class Week of November 23rd for Thanksgiving Break
Tuesday, December 1st – Persuasive Essay, Arguing for Action and How to Avoid Replicating the Convincing Essay:  Focusing on Action and Appeals
For Thursday, December 3rd:

  • Reflection #13 – Carefully read Martin Luther King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” in The Aims of Argument (pp. 250 – 265). Prepare notes on the 4 sets of questions for Following Through on p. 267 and the Following Through on page 268.  These will count toward your participation grade.  (This will be due on Thursday, December 3rd.
  • Draft your lead for the persuasive essay and bring a hard copy of your lead to class on Thursday.
  • Bring your Text to Class on Thursday, December 3rd.

Thursday, December 3rd – Letter from Birmingham Jail” in The Aims of Argument, Study of Appeals
King Questions Due
For Tuesday, December 8th:

  • Continue drafting your Persuasive Essay, being mindful of the usefulness of appeals.

Tuesday, December 8th – Applying Stylistic Techniques and Style and the Persuasive Essay
For Thursday, December 10th:

  • For Tuesday’s class you will need a hard copy of your persuasive essay for workshop.  Your draft must be a full draft.  If you do not bring a full draft, then I reserve the right to lower your essay grade.

Thursday, December 10th – Peer Review Workshop Persuasive Essay, Mandatory/Essential
For Final Exam Period:

  • Prepare your persuasive essay for submission.  Please submit final draft and working drafts in pocket folder; include each and every one of your sources.

Final Exam – Persuasive Essay Postscript
Persuasive Essay Due